Month: November 2016

Friends’ Asylum Demographics, 1817-1837

Over the first two decades the Friends’ Asylum admitted 540 patients. Fortunately, very good records survive—in the form of an Admissions Book, other admissions and discharge documents, Superintendent’s Daybook, and Medical Casebooks—that allow us to reconstruct what types of patients were at the Asylum, what forms of insanity staff at the Asylum recognized, where patients came from, how much they paid to stay there, and what sorts of treatment they received. Unfortunately, all that information is not (yet) in a form that is very handy. But even this overview of patient demographics drawn from the Admissions Book raises interesting questions.

Pages from the “Admission Book, Friends’ Asylum for the Insane” showing entries for patients nos. 369-414, admitted from October 23, 1833 to January 15, 1834.
Pages from the “Admission Book, Friends’ Asylum for the Insane” showing entries for patients nos. 369-414, admitted from October 23, 1833 to January 15, 1834.
Summary of Patients Admitted to Friends’ Asylum, 1817–1837
Total Single Married Widowed
Men 287 (53%) 154 (54%) 115 (40%) 15 (5%)
Women 253 (47%) 131 (52%) 82 (32%) 35 (14%)
Total 540 (100%) 285 (53%) 197 (37%) 50 (9%)

In the first twenty years, the Asylum readmitted 74 patients more than once. One male patient was readmitted 10 times, another two were readmitted 6 times, approximately 60 were readmitted at least twice. Extreme readmission rates seem to have declined slightly in the 1830s, i.e., the numbers of patients readmitted more than twice.[1]

Almost half the patients were discharged as “Restored,” but again that number disguises the fact that of the 24 patients admitted three times or more, they were discharged 27 times as “Restored.” In the case of the male patient admitted 10 times, he was discharged 8 times “Restored.”

Patients Condition on Discharge from the Asylum
Total Admissions Restored Much Improved Improved Stationary Died
Men 286 130 (45%) 34 (12%) 30 (10%) 39 (14%) 53 (19%)
Women 253 104 (41%) 33 (13%) 34 (13%) 34 (13%) 48 (19%)
Total 539 235 (44%) 67 (12%) 64 (12%) 73 (14%) 101 (19%)

Before being admitted to the Asylum patients had suffered from their affliction anywhere from 2 days to 48 years. The average length of time admitted patients had been insane was about 3 years and 4 months. Patients stayed in the Asylum as few at a couple days (many of these very short stays ended in the patient’s death) to nearly 47 years (many of these very long stays also ended in death, though probably for different reasons). 70 patients (42 males; 28 females) admitted during these first two decades spent less than a month in the Asylum. 30 patients (18 males; 12 females)admitted during the same period spent more than 10 years in the Asylum.

While the vast majority of patients were local—198 from Philadelphia, 189 from Pennsylvania, and 88 from New Jersey—as the Asylum’s reputation grew in the 1830s patients started turning up from more distant places, e.g., Virginia, North and South Carolinas, Ohio, and Indiana.

The early patient entries are incomplete, many of the columns in the Register were left blank.[2] In the mid–1830s staff began recording both the forms and supposed causes of a patient’s insanity. “Mania” and “Dementia” are the two most commonly recorded forms of insanity. While both are so common as to seem generic labels rather than specific diagnoses, staff did distinguish between different causes of these generic afflictions.

Common forms of insanity & their causes
Form Supposed causes
mania abuse of opium, amenorrhea, blow to the head, bodily injury, congestion of the brain, defective education, disappointed affection, domestic trouble, intemperance, masturbation, paralysis, pecuniary difficulty, puerperal, religious excitement
dementia domestic trouble, epilepsy, fever, pecuniary difficulty
monomania religious excitement

That the same causes give rise to different forms of insanity suggests staff were observing different symptoms. The range and types of supposed causes raise questions. How is “defective education” (suffered by a 17yo male; restored after a month) and “amenorrhea” (suffered by a 20yo female; restored after 3 months) related? At first glance, the first seems entirely social, while the second seems more like a biological cause.

This information suggests many different topics to pursue and, as I mentioned previously, this summary hides fascinating individual stories (yes, Patient #33’s story is still pending). As I work through the other sources and analyze the information I compile, I will continue to post my conclusions. Stay tuned.


  1. The outliers, the patient readmitted 10, raises all sorts of questions. The number of patients readmitted twice seems to have been fairly constant, but is right now an approximate value because the Patient Registers are not complete.  ↩

  2. Some of this information can be gleaned from other sources. As I work through these other sources, I will fill in what details I can.  ↩

Patients at the Friends’ Asylum, 1817-1833

On May 15, 1817 the Friends’ Asylum for the Relief of Persons Deprived of the Use of their Reason opened its doors to patients. Over the previous three and a half years the board of local, influential Philadelphia Quakers had raised money to purchase land, had overseen the design and fabrication of every aspect of the project, and had contracted with local craftsmen to build the Asylum.

View of the Asylum from annual report for 1820, State of the Asylum for the Relief of Persons Deprived of the Use of Their Reason (1820)
View of the Asylum from annual report for 1820, State of the Asylum for the Relief of Persons Deprived of the Use of Their Reason (1820)

In early 1817 the first superintendent, Isaac Bonsall, and his family moved into the Asylum buildings and completed the final preparations for its opening. When the Asylum opened its doors for patients, Bonsall with some disappointment noted in his daybook that no patients turned up:

Isaac Bonsall noted in his daybook that the “House is considered open“ yet no patients came. See “Superintendent’s Daybook, vol 1”
Isaac Bonsall noted in his daybook that the “House is considered open“ yet no patients came. See “Superintendent’s Daybook, vol 1

Fifth 15
This day the House is considered as open for reception of Persons deprived of the use of their reason but none came. 17 other persons were here—

Bonsall had little reason for concern. Five days later the first patient arrived, a 48 year-old woman who had “been 11 Years insane—She appears to be of the Melancholy cast.” People continued to bring patients to the Asylum, entrusting family members to the care of Bonsall and the Asylum’s staff. Over the first 15 years the Asylum would admit more 350 patients. Here is an initial overview of those patients, compiled largely from the Patient Register.

Over the first 15 years more men than women were admitted to Friends’ Asylum. Most (just over half) of the people admitted were single, a third were married, and about ten percent were widowed (the numbers don’t add up to the total (363) because the Patient Register doesn’t record marital status for every patient).

General Summary of Patients
(admitted through 1833)
Total Number Total Percentage Single Married Widowed
Men 194 53% 106 79 7
Women 169 47% 84 52 28
Total 363 (100%) 190 131 35

These rough numbers obscure the 51 patients who were admitted more than once, one as many as 10 times. Removing these, 280 unique patients were admitted to the Asylum.

Of the total number of patients admitted, almost half were considered “Restored” when they left the asylum.

Patient Condition on Leaving the Asylum
Total Admissions Restored Much Improved Improved Stationary Died
Men 194 82 (42%) 30 (15%) 18 (9%) 26 (13%) 38 (20%)
Women 169 70 (41%) 26 (15%) 21 (12%) 16 (9%) 36 (21%)
Total 363 152 (42%) 56 (15%) 39 (11%) 42 (12%) 74 (20%)

What exactly “Restored” meant, however, is unclear. The patient who was admitted 10 times was released the first 8 times “Restored,” the ninth “Much improved.” When he was admitted the last time, he spent more than two years there before finally dying in the Asylum “of Inflammation of the Stomach” (in total he spent three and a half years in the Asylum).

Patients stayed in the Asylum anywhere from 2 days to more than 40 years (14724 days). The average length of stay is 27 months. Patients who were there only a couple days as well as those who were there for years tended to die in the Asylum (probably from different causes—the former probably suffered from some acute illness, the latter from some chronic condition or simply old age). The median length of stay was 155 days.

Although the founders of the Asylum might have had a preference for “recent, curable patients,”[1] in fact it seems that many of the patients admitted over the first 15 or so years had been insane for more than two years. One patient was listed as having been insane for 44 years (another twenty or so had been insane for more than 20 years). At the other extreme, about 30 patients were listed as having been insane for fewer than 10 days.

Average duration of insanity before admission. For some reason 1817 and 1830 have particularly long average durations.
Average duration of insanity before admission. For some reason 1817 and 1830 have particularly long average durations.

Patients ranged in age from 16 years to 93 years. The average age for both men and women was 40.

Most patients were local. 122 were from Philadelphia and another 136 from Pennsylvania. 68 came from New Jersey. After that numbers dropped off quickly: e.g., 11 from Delaware; 7 from New York. A few came from as far away as Virginia and Rhode Island. In one case, a patient had previously been a patient in the York Retreat in England.[2]

This aggregate survey of the patients at the Friends’ Asylum, drawn largely from the Patient Register, raises all sorts of interesting questions, e.g., Why were some patients readmitted so many times? What did they mean by “Restored” or “Much Improved?” What symptoms were considered evidence of insanity, especially in the cases where a patient had been insane for 2 or 3 or 4 days? Because it effaces the individual patients, this survey of the Patient Register also raises questions about the stories of those individual patients, such as the young woman, patient #33, whose family brought her to the Asylum late one Saturday. She had been insane for six days….

Her story will be the subject of a future post.


  1. On the Asylum’s possible preference for “recent, curable patients,” see the excellent Quakers & Mental Health, especially the “Foundations of Friends’ Asylum” page.  ↩

  2. Friends’ Asylum was modeled on the York Retreat. See, “The York Retreat” and “Foundations of Friends’ Asylum.”  ↩