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Pulp Scholarship

Daughters of the Copernican Revolution

In honor of Copernicus’s 545th birthday, I thought I would read T. Koon’s best seller, The Copernican Revolutionary. Imagine my surprise when I found folded inside the back cover the following certificate: This certifies that Miss Etta Clara Hoyt is a regularly approved member of the International Society of the Daughters of the Copernican Revolution […]

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Pulp Scholarship

Trust In Numbers

Given Ted Porter’s interest numbers and statistics, I would not be surprised if he wrote murder mysteries about gambling and money. The three wives was just icing on the murderous cake.

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Pulp Scholarship

Leviathan and the Broken Air-Pump

What if Shapin and Schaffer’s classic, Leviathan and the Air-Pump were one in a series about the adventures of Rob Boyle, deep-sea explorer and treasure-hunter?

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Pulp Scholarship

Fugitives from the Closed World

Alexandre Kroyé almost certainly would write science fiction, sort of a Logan’s Run dystopian escape adventure.

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Pulp Scholarship

Silenced Spring

Rachel Carson would have to write a murder mystery, I suspect, about involved a young socialite who knew too much and a sinister Dr. D.D. Thornton.

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Pulp Scholarship

The Death of Mlle. Nature

When Carolyn Merchant tires of writing careful, scholarly works about ecology and the scientific revolution, perhaps she will try something a little edgier, like murder mysteries.

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Pulp Scholarship

The Copernican Revolutionary

Thomas Kuhn, writing under a pretty lame nom de plume, tried his hand at historical pulp fiction. The story of a Revolutionary War-era woman who refused to live by society’s patriarchal norms. Ok, there’s no way Thomas Kuhn could have written such a book. But it’s fun to pretend.

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Pulp Scholarship

Galileo’s Courtesan

In a conversation recently, a student commented something like, “At first I couldn’t recall the title of Biagioli’s book. All I could think of was Galileo Courtesan.”[1] His remark prompted me to wonder what would scholarship look like if written as mid–20th-century pulp fiction. Maybe something like this: I would give anything to stumble across […]